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Best version of Windows?

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To be honest the newest iterations of Windows are always overall better, it's the problems everybody sees and pokes holes in them. Windows 10 is just all around better than 7, there are a few things I wish were different. Mostly it is better. 

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Explain "locked down", there is no actual way to disable certain tracking mechanisms. Let alone the Diagnostic Tracking service was updated by Micro$chuft just to turn it on for those people who "deactivated" it through certain programs.

 

The whole OS is built around tracking and sending user behaviour for no valid reason, so for me it falls through "the best OS" criteria.

 

 

Tbh i have nothing to hide. In-less MS are interested in my porn habits  :D

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Spybot Anti-Beacon for Windows 10 is great (not sure if placebo or not) but your e-mail app and Skype won't run properly if you aren't careful and were to apply all of them.

 

 

I use this too, 

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Fresh install of 10, the key being fresh...  7 is ok but unless you can point to something you like about it that works for you, no reason I've come across not to do 10.

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Using Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit. Most people tend to recommend Windows 10 as it's lighter and supports DirectX 12. Thing is, Vulkan is another API that can rival that of DirectX 12 and is cross-platform; currently in final stages as well. That alone is the reason why I don't feel the need to upgrade to Windows 10 at the moment. I probably will eventually, but not any time soon. 

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Spybot Anti-Beacon for Windows 10 is great (not sure if placebo or not) but your e-mail app and Skype won't run properly if you aren't careful and were to apply all of them.

 

Just tried this out. If it's put out by Safer-Networking then it has my approval.

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Tbh i have nothing to hide. In-less MS are interested in my porn habits  :D

Privacy isn't just about "hiding porn".

1. Limit on Power

Privacy is a limit on government power, as well as the power of private sector companies. The more someone knows about us, the more power they can have over us. Personal data is used to make very important decisions in our lives. Personal data can be used to affect our reputations; and it can be used to influence our decisions and shape our behavior. It can be used as a tool to exercise control over us. And in the wrong hands, personal data can be used to cause us great harm.

2. Respect for Individuals

Privacy is about respecting individuals. If a person has a reasonable desire to keep something private, it is disrespectful to ignore that person’s wishes without a compelling reason to do so. Of course, the desire for privacy can conflict with important values, so privacy may not always win out in the balance. Sometimes people’s desires for privacy are just brushed aside because of a view that the harm in doing so is trivial. Even if this doesn’t cause major injury, it demonstrates a lack of respect for that person. In a sense it is saying: “I care about my interests, but I don’t care about yours.”

3. Reputation Management

Privacy enables people to manage their reputations. How we are judged by others affects our opportunities, friendships, and overall well-being. Although we can’t have complete control over our reputations, we must have some ability to protect our reputations from being unfairly harmed. Protecting reputation depends on protecting against not only falsehoods but also certain truths. Knowing private details about people’s lives doesn’t necessarily lead to more accurate judgment about people. People judge badly, they judge in haste, they judge out of context, they judge without hearing the whole story, and they judge with hypocrisy. Privacy helps people protect themselves from these troublesome judgments.

4. Maintaining Appropriate Social Boundaries

People establish boundaries from others in society. These boundaries are both physical and informational. We need places of solitude to retreat to, places where we are free of the gaze of others in order to relax and feel at ease. We also establish informational boundaries, and we have an elaborate set of these boundaries for the many different relationships we have. Privacy helps people manage these boundaries. Breaches of these boundaries can create awkward social situations and damage our relationships. Privacy is also helpful to reduce the social friction we encounter in life. Most people don’t want everybody to know everything about them – hence the phrase “none of your business.” And sometimes we don’t want to know everything about other people -- hence the phrase “too much information.”

5. Trust

In relationships, whether personal, professional, governmental, or commercial, we depend upon trusting the other party. Breaches of confidentiality are breaches of that trust. In professional relationships such as our relationships with doctors and lawyers, this trust is key to maintaining candor in the relationship. Likewise, we trust other people we interact with as well as the companies we do business with. When trust is breached in one relationship, that could make us more reluctant to trust in other relationships.

6. Control Over One’s Life

Personal data is essential to so many decisions made about us, from whether we get a loan, a license or a job to our personal and professional reputations. Personal data is used to determine whether we are investigated by the government, or searched at the airport, or denied the ability to fly. Indeed, personal data affects nearly everything, including what messages and content we see on the Internet. Without having knowledge of what data is being used, how it is being used, the ability to correct and amend it, we are virtually helpless in today’s world. Moreover, we are helpless without the ability to have a say in how our data is used or the ability to object and have legitimate grievances be heard when data uses can harm us. One of the hallmarks of freedom is having autonomy and control over our lives, and we can’t have that if so many important decisions about us are being made in secret without our awareness or participation.

7. Freedom of Thought and Speech

Privacy is key to freedom of thought. A watchful eye over everything we read or watch can chill us from exploring ideas outside the mainstream. Privacy is also key to protecting speaking unpopular messages. And privacy doesn’t just protect fringe activities. We may want to criticize people we know to others yet not share that criticism with the world. A person might want to explore ideas that their family or friends or colleagues dislike.

8. Freedom of Social and Political Activities

Privacy helps protect our ability to associate with other people and engage in political activity. A key component of freedom of political association is the ability to do so with privacy if one chooses. We protect privacy at the ballot because of the concern that failing to do so would chill people’s voting their true conscience. Privacy of the associations and activities that lead up to going to the voting booth matters as well, because this is how we form and discuss our political beliefs. The watchful eye can disrupt and unduly influence these activities.

9. Ability to Change and Have Second Chances

Many people are not static; they change and grow throughout their lives. There is a great value in the ability to have a second chance, to be able to move beyond a mistake, to be able to reinvent oneself. Privacy nurtures this ability. It allows people to grow and mature without being shackled with all the foolish things they might have done in the past. Certainly, not all misdeeds should be shielded, but some should be, because we want to encourage and facilitate growth and improvement.

10. Not Having to Explain or Justify Oneself

An important reason why privacy matters is not having to explain or justify oneself. We may do a lot of things which, if judged from afar by others lacking complete knowledge or understanding, may seem odd or embarrassing or worse. It can be a heavy burden if we constantly have to wonder how everything we do will be perceived by others and have to be at the ready to explain.

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Privacy isn't just about "hiding porn".

1. Limit on Power

Privacy is a limit on government power, as well as the power of private sector companies. The more someone knows about us, the more power they can have over us. Personal data is used to make very important decisions in our lives. Personal data can be used to affect our reputations; and it can be used to influence our decisions and shape our behavior. It can be used as a tool to exercise control over us. And in the wrong hands, personal data can be used to cause us great harm.

2. Respect for Individuals

Privacy is about respecting individuals. If a person has a reasonable desire to keep something private, it is disrespectful to ignore that person’s wishes without a compelling reason to do so. Of course, the desire for privacy can conflict with important values, so privacy may not always win out in the balance. Sometimes people’s desires for privacy are just brushed aside because of a view that the harm in doing so is trivial. Even if this doesn’t cause major injury, it demonstrates a lack of respect for that person. In a sense it is saying: “I care about my interests, but I don’t care about yours.”

3. Reputation Management

Privacy enables people to manage their reputations. How we are judged by others affects our opportunities, friendships, and overall well-being. Although we can’t have complete control over our reputations, we must have some ability to protect our reputations from being unfairly harmed. Protecting reputation depends on protecting against not only falsehoods but also certain truths. Knowing private details about people’s lives doesn’t necessarily lead to more accurate judgment about people. People judge badly, they judge in haste, they judge out of context, they judge without hearing the whole story, and they judge with hypocrisy. Privacy helps people protect themselves from these troublesome judgments.

4. Maintaining Appropriate Social Boundaries

People establish boundaries from others in society. These boundaries are both physical and informational. We need places of solitude to retreat to, places where we are free of the gaze of others in order to relax and feel at ease. We also establish informational boundaries, and we have an elaborate set of these boundaries for the many different relationships we have. Privacy helps people manage these boundaries. Breaches of these boundaries can create awkward social situations and damage our relationships. Privacy is also helpful to reduce the social friction we encounter in life. Most people don’t want everybody to know everything about them – hence the phrase “none of your business.” And sometimes we don’t want to know everything about other people -- hence the phrase “too much information.”

5. Trust

In relationships, whether personal, professional, governmental, or commercial, we depend upon trusting the other party. Breaches of confidentiality are breaches of that trust. In professional relationships such as our relationships with doctors and lawyers, this trust is key to maintaining candor in the relationship. Likewise, we trust other people we interact with as well as the companies we do business with. When trust is breached in one relationship, that could make us more reluctant to trust in other relationships.

6. Control Over One’s Life

Personal data is essential to so many decisions made about us, from whether we get a loan, a license or a job to our personal and professional reputations. Personal data is used to determine whether we are investigated by the government, or searched at the airport, or denied the ability to fly. Indeed, personal data affects nearly everything, including what messages and content we see on the Internet. Without having knowledge of what data is being used, how it is being used, the ability to correct and amend it, we are virtually helpless in today’s world. Moreover, we are helpless without the ability to have a say in how our data is used or the ability to object and have legitimate grievances be heard when data uses can harm us. One of the hallmarks of freedom is having autonomy and control over our lives, and we can’t have that if so many important decisions about us are being made in secret without our awareness or participation.

7. Freedom of Thought and Speech

Privacy is key to freedom of thought. A watchful eye over everything we read or watch can chill us from exploring ideas outside the mainstream. Privacy is also key to protecting speaking unpopular messages. And privacy doesn’t just protect fringe activities. We may want to criticize people we know to others yet not share that criticism with the world. A person might want to explore ideas that their family or friends or colleagues dislike.

8. Freedom of Social and Political Activities

Privacy helps protect our ability to associate with other people and engage in political activity. A key component of freedom of political association is the ability to do so with privacy if one chooses. We protect privacy at the ballot because of the concern that failing to do so would chill people’s voting their true conscience. Privacy of the associations and activities that lead up to going to the voting booth matters as well, because this is how we form and discuss our political beliefs. The watchful eye can disrupt and unduly influence these activities.

9. Ability to Change and Have Second Chances

Many people are not static; they change and grow throughout their lives. There is a great value in the ability to have a second chance, to be able to move beyond a mistake, to be able to reinvent oneself. Privacy nurtures this ability. It allows people to grow and mature without being shackled with all the foolish things they might have done in the past. Certainly, not all misdeeds should be shielded, but some should be, because we want to encourage and facilitate growth and improvement.

10. Not Having to Explain or Justify Oneself

An important reason why privacy matters is not having to explain or justify oneself. We may do a lot of things which, if judged from afar by others lacking complete knowledge or understanding, may seem odd or embarrassing or worse. It can be a heavy burden if we constantly have to wonder how everything we do will be perceived by others and have to be at the ready to explain.

I think you can go farther brother. Can people plan a revolution when they are being monitored? No. It's a fundamental Liberty our forefathers were very cognizant of. Sometimes we do have something to hide, like planning the overthrow of a despot, and that's ok!

Props to those who get it.

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I think you can go farther brother. Can people plan a revolution when they are being monitored? No. It's a fundamental Liberty our forefathers were very cognizant of.

That covers most of the points I quoted ^^

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What i really want to know, is there any performance difference in Squad, win 7 vs 10 ??

Windows 8 was the worst windows i ever tried since windows ME. Next reinstall will be 10.

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What if your parents where to find those targeted ads in your start menu?

^_^

XD

Dont live with my parent, im a grown ass man-boy LEL!!

My point being, i dont do much on the pc. Play a game or watch youtube.. So MS can spy whatever they want.

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Win 10, its faster than 7 and has directx 12support and cortana^^ just joking.

And yes win 10 is tracking evrybody said, but i have no problem with it because evry Programm even Firefox has the posibility to do the Same. they should already do and just have better classified security.

The other thing about tracking is if they dont track your OS they can still stalk u on facebook with profiles like Chuck Norris evrybody wants to be in his friendlist :-)

Just my 50 Cent about win 10 and tracking.

Edit: i forgot u asked for BEST Windows, get WIN 95 ;-)

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I think you can go farther brother. Can people plan a revolution when they are being monitored? No. It's a fundamental Liberty our forefathers were very cognizant of. Sometimes we do have something to hide, like planning the overthrow of a despot, and that's ok!

Props to those who get it.

Oh come on now. Everyone knows not to plot the downfall of governments on their gaming machines. If Microsoft want to know I love playing Squad for hours I couldn't give two s**ts. You've only got to look at Blackberry's misfortune to know there is a conspiracy though.

Virtual Box now works under Win 10 so you can do your plotting from within another secure OS under Win 10.

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Lol, if i want to Plan Revolution i gonna turn off my PC, Snartphone Tablets and shit, then i starting on writing "real Letters" and Talk in RL to ppl. i think u guys know what i mean. this is what they dont track because they think handmade Mails are dead xD

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Lol, if i want to Plan Revolution i gonna turn off my PC, Snartphone Tablets and shit, then i starting on writing "real Letters" and Talk in RL to ppl. i think u guys know what i mean. this is what they dont track because they think handmade Mails are dead xD

He was more about his fundamental rights than about actual practices of doing such a thing.

​All you're proving is that it makes you not want to use the already given, comfortable systems that COULD help you with such a thing.

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Sounds like 7 is still the best as no one posted any cons about it lol.

Edit: other than dx12.

 

I come from Windows 7 and I never wanted to upgrade to Windows 10. Not in a million years I would!  :lol:

Now that I have upgraded freely and used it for a while I know. . 

 

The difference is absolutely gigantic! A whole new world of os!

 

Pro's

-Access to insider builds and next threshold updates

-Apps loads a lot faster, applications run faster, better optimization for programs can't compare this to W7

-Games start and exit faster, prob also gain you some fps even in DX11 just fresh optimization etc 

-Newer os, better functions, updated way more often then windows 7 will (that is dead)

-Windows 10 looks like a new windows 7 (yes its true i have been using 7 a long while)

-Really good update system way better than W7.

-Boot time vs Windows 7 is a huge difference (I use fast SSD)

-Full DX12 implementation 

-Newest drivers and support, so better system stability probably even cooler temps overall

-Pretty good customization start menu with small icons, titles, recent finder etc handy stuff works fast and well.

-Ton of other stuff!

 

Minor cons

-its new and young os but threshold 3 is here soon so then... pretty nice and stable :)

-apps is nuisance, (turn them all off)

-apps system is a failure but hey windows 8 failed in that too and seemingly some engineers at Microsoft still need the sack  :) who care? no i dont need much apps myself a few i use tho :) and i still have to admit they can be handy

 

Now that I have done that I know Windows 7 is not even in the league of Windows 10, it's a old dinosaur.

Keep in mind, Windows 7 was never designed for multi core amd cpu's and prob also intel multi core (quad, hexa, octa) cpu's. Using it bottlenecks your entire system, yes you read that right! 

Everyone that still uses Windows 7 on a decent pc here will be better off in Windows 10 by miles and miles!

What is also strange to me, many AMD/Intel users complain about bad performance and low fps right? But STILL use Windows 7 and a just very old os on new hardware.

 

That said Windows 7 is always there to go back trusted and great os, if needed to!

It's just lightning fast so a "no brainer" to get W10, threshold 3 coming up too.

 

PS. If hesitant to upgrade, you can just simply dual boot and install both os next to each other easily create new partition for it etc but you need a new version of w10 i think. paid, upgrade might not work then please note that!

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The best Windows is the one you dont install on your PC (except if you want your private life being spread everywhere) - and Win10 even with all useless features disabled is still way too much intrusive. DX12 is good ! but my privacy is not worth it.

The less bad Windows is Win7 (100% subjective).

And the best OS is... not a Windows one :P

 

To answer more specifically to OP :

I'd choose Win7 as Win7 security updates will last for the next 5 years (til Jan 14, 2020) ; and eventually, IF Win10 becomes really good (in matter of gaming support, gfx support and so on) upgrade 7 to 10 later.

If you dont care about privacy, maybe choose Win10 for DX12 if its a gaming rig.

 

I can only insist on building another secure Linux PC for your personnal life (emails, transactions, personnal documents...) but this is not the matter of the topic.

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Windows 10. It turns on faster, runs better, I get more fps in games and has better and more features than the previous ones. It's not 100% done yet so menu inconsistencies and lack of advanced options in the new menus can be frustrating.

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Win8.1, got a good boost in gaming performance over Win7 and it's been out long enough to be rock solid with most games/applications.

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I hope someday we could customize our own OS to have what modules we want in it and what to leave out. And that they could last forever always being updated as needed, so I just have to buy one OS and use it for life. :) Dreams of the future.

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I hope someday we could customize our own OS to have what modules we want in it and what to leave out. And that they could last forever always being updated as needed, so I just have to buy one OS and use it for life. :) Dreams of the future.

Linux in a nutshell, also it's free.

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