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RB79BALL

In the matter of area control game mode

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Posted (edited)

I find this experimental game mode bring in new thought on tactics and fresh ideas into the game. The level of SL coordination are getting significantly more important. In my opinion, this is an advanced game mode for experienced players / clan only at the moment.

 

The necessity of having a commander playing in the map mode to coordinate the squads are getting even more important. I have seen flanking Squad manage to cut off the map for a total victory and a coordinate line advance can crush the front line resistance. On another hand, I have also seen a team with independent SL doing their own capturing and being teared apart. In general, this game mode is more prone to a one sided battle than any other modes. Coordination bares a much stronger multiplier in this mode.

 

I think reducing the difficult for SLs in this mode would be a good idea. I would propose that radio cannot be place at X meters away from the capture zones. This limited the number of possible enemy entry point and limit the player to fight along the front line. Another quick fix can be increasing the size of the hex and increasing the capture-able area. I wish these 2 changes can help the squad to have better grasp on the battlefield situation and have a front line combat that is intended by the developers. 

 

I personally like the area control mode more than any other modes as it is closest to an organised invasion operation of an army, but I do hear lots of players hating this mode to their guts. What's you opinion on the mode and do you think if any changes can be made? 

Edited by RB79BALL

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Posted (edited)

I think territory control will eventually do a good job of simulating a wide area offensive, just as AAS/RAAS does a good job of simulating operations targeted at specific map features. But like you said, it probably needs a bit of tweaking. Currently the hexes are too small and are captured too fast, so we end up with squads moving out and dropping people off along the way to capture individual hexes, which causes problems with squad cohesion and positioning. This makes the game pacing even faster than AAS and easily overwhelms the people in command. It's also quite frequent that you have to give up a good position and go stand out in the open in the middle of a field (especially in Scorpo), because the good position happens to be right on the border of two hexes or 5 meters inside the hex next to the one you are trying to capture.

 

I'd suggest to cover the map in fewer, bigger hexes that take longer to capture, or even make hexes of unequal sizes to split the map into different areas of importance (e.g, a good, defensible compound could be a hex of its own, regardless of the size of other hexes, a small city could be a number of its own hexes too, and so on). This way squads are encouraged to stick together for longer, the pacing slows down somewhat to let SLs manage the situation and with each hex being bigger, there is more chance of each one containing a mix of different terrain to use.

 

The rest of it is pretty much as you describe and we'll see even better tactics once we get helicopters and a commander role to coordinate everything. Until that happens though and with the current mechanics and assets at our disposal, i think the most effective tactic is to do what the Germans did in the beginning of WW2 with blitzkrieg and what the Soviets did later during the war with deep strike/battle doctrines.

 

Have the armor and MRAPs advance from the sides and try to link up at some point in the middle, bypassing any enemy strongpoints as they go. The aim is not to kill the enemy, but to encircle and cut off a large (but not too large) number of hexes. This places the armor in the middle of enemy territory and behind the frontline, so it's a bit dangerous. The trick then is not to go too deep, so that the friendly infantry can advance from the frontlines and link up with the armor, clearing any areas of enemy resistance as they go and capturing the cutoff hexes. At that point the armor is behind the enemy frontline troops and can support the friendly infantry from a flanking position, or even advance back towards the friendly frontline to help cap the remaining hexes. Rinse and repeat for a win.

Edited by Burningbeard80

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13 hours ago, Burningbeard80 said:

I think territory control will eventually do a good job of simulating a wide area offensive, just as AAS/RAAS does a good job of simulating operations targeted at specific map features. But like you said, it probably needs a bit of tweaking. Currently the hexes are too small and are captured too fast, so we end up with squads moving out and dropping people off along the way to capture individual hexes, which causes problems with squad cohesion and positioning. This makes the game pacing even faster than AAS and easily overwhelms the people in command. It's also quite frequent that you have to give up a good position and go stand out in the open in the middle of a field (especially in Scorpo), because the good position happens to be right on the border of two hexes or 5 meters inside the hex next to the one you are trying to capture.

 

I'd suggest to cover the map in fewer, bigger hexes that take longer to capture, or even make hexes of unequal sizes to split the map into different areas of importance (e.g, a good, defensible compound could be a hex of its own, regardless of the size of other hexes, a small city could be a number of its own hexes too, and so on). This way squads are encouraged to stick together for longer, the pacing slows down somewhat to let SLs manage the situation and with each hex being bigger, there is more chance of each one containing a mix of different terrain to use.

 

The rest of it is pretty much as you describe and we'll see even better tactics once we get helicopters and a commander role to coordinate everything. Until that happens though and with the current mechanics and assets at our disposal, i think the most effective tactic is to do what the Germans did in the beginning of WW2 with blitzkrieg and what the Soviets did later during the war with deep strike/battle doctrines.

 

Have the armor and MRAPs advance from the sides and try to link up at some point in the middle, bypassing any enemy strongpoints as they go. The aim is not to kill the enemy, but to encircle and cut off a large (but not too large) number of hexes. This places the armor in the middle of enemy territory and behind the frontline, so it's a bit dangerous. The trick then is not to go too deep, so that the friendly infantry can advance from the frontlines and link up with the armor, clearing any areas of enemy resistance as they go and capturing the cutoff hexes. At that point the armor is behind the enemy frontline troops and can support the friendly infantry from a flanking position, or even advance back towards the friendly frontline to help cap the remaining hexes. Rinse and repeat for a win.

Good thought in resizing the area. However, that will mean all the maps will need to be tailor fitted with varying hex sizes. It will be resource draining for the dev and I would say a general increment of hex size would be sufficient for a quick fix. What do you think?

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Yes, as a first balancing pass it could be sufficient to just play around a bit with hex sizes and see how that affects gameplay.

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Not sure why they don't cover the entire map in this mode. Seems like they are not taking advantage of it by only covering a portion of the map in hexes. 

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