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M110 - Awfully weak

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I agree with this topic. M110 should be about same damage as SVD. 762x51 is a very powerful round and should be a 1 shot kill to chest since no armor system has been added to the game

 

Seriously, some people should stop complaining about how 1 shot kills would ruin gameplay. You want balanced weapons ? go play battlefield because one the main features apart from teamwork is realism .

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1 hour ago, maze2 said:

You want balanced weapons ? go play battlefield

That made my day! xD Balanced weapons yeah.... BF is first just a casual shooter of coolness and cinematics, Balnce and Fair is far far away from what BF now become....

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8 hours ago, Bahrein said:

No basicly thay are not the same.Becouse you wrote the wrong fps specs 830 m/s (2,723 ft/s) (SVD) Now those are the specs for the real SVD the SSSR one not to be mistaken with other modernized versions that Russian army has today or shorter version.

No, you wrote the wrong FPS specs, because you just looked at a single number on the SVD wikipedia page instead of taking into account which loads will achieve which muzzle velocities. Regardless of barrel length, a weapon will achieve different muzzle velocities depending on the ammo used.

 

The kind of surplus 7.62x54mm ammo a typical insurgent has access to ranges in bullet weight from 147 to 181 grain. An SVD might get 2700 FPS out of lighter loads in the 140-160gr range (so will an M110!) but the 170-180gr loads will be around 2600 fps. A more discerning insurgent sniper would probably go for the heavier bullet weights, as they tend to retain a more stable path over distance.

 

Likewise, the most common load issued for M110 is the 175gr M118LR or Mk316 match rounds traveling at 2600 fps, but depending on the situation, it may also be used with the M993 127gr AP round or the Mk319 130gr OTM round... both of which exceed 2900 fps. The Mk319 also regularly fragments extremely early during its path through flesh, causing massive damage untouched by any milspec 7.62x54mm load.

 

Ultimately, a few extra inches of barrel length means nothing in terms of lethality next to ammunition. It's technically possible that a discerning insurgent sniper could somehow source quality match ammo which performs comparably to M110 loads, but it's not as likely considering that US snipers and DM's have a direct pipeline to purpose-built ammunition.

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You could also make the argument that the Insurgent ammo is so old and low quality that it fragments extremely early. Though it'd be a strung out argument.

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On 2/18/2018 at 1:19 AM, Peerun said:

You could also make the argument that the Insurgent ammo is so old and low quality that it fragments extremely early. Though it'd be a strung out argument.

I am sure thats not that true buddy.

There are not that much bullets in wear houses that old as much as thay are used this days.Mortar shells,tank shells and granades maybe but bullets not that much.

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On 2/17/2018 at 7:19 PM, Peerun said:

You could also make the argument that the Insurgent ammo is so old and low quality that it fragments extremely early. Though it'd be a strung out argument.

That's not how it works. Bullet fragmentation in flesh is a direct result of its original construction; not age.

 

For example, loads like Mk318 and Mk319 are made with a reverse-drawn jacket process which is good for making accurate, consistent bullets... but as a side effect leaves an open tip that causes mushrooming and fragmenting in dense mediums.

 

Another example is the standard M80 7.62 ball round, which is made with either a copper or steel jacket. The steel jacket is more brittle than the copper and has been shown to fragment at velocities over 2800 fps. You will not get the copper version to perform like the steel version simply by leaving it in a box for a while.

 

The old Russian 7N1 sniper load is another example of a surplus round that has been known to tumble and fragment, because of the core's "steel in front, lead in back" composition. This leads to a weight distribution even more lopsided than usual for a spitzer bullet, which causes it to yaw in dense mediums - at which point the differing metals tend separate under the stress.

 

These effects were all found through scientific testing which included the comparison of various old milsurp rounds. Ballistics experts who've conducted these tests have been quite emphatic that old soviet ball rounds like M43 and Type L, which weren't constructed in a way conducive to fragmentation, DON'T exhibit fragmentary effects.

Edited by Gnalvl

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